• Maryland’s school funding formula disadvantages rural counties, especially since we face a cycle of declining enrollments, leading to school closings and consolidations, leading to unsustainable towns, leading to further population loss and declining school enrollments.
    • Maryland should adopt a different school funding formula for application in smaller communities in rural areas. The simple fact is that a school is often the centerpiece of communal life in a small town – take away the school, and you kill the town. In a larger community, the closing of a school may be traumatic but is not a death knell for the community. A town with four elementary schools will survive with only three. But the town with only one may not survive without it. Among other factors, potential new residents will not choose to move to a town that has nary a school.
  • A centralized Tech Ed program on the Sollers Point model is feasible.
    • I do not believe enough consideration has been given to the design of a centralized high school magnet tech ed program such as Baltimore County has had at Sollers Point in Dundalk. That school has six feeder schools. Students attend their tech ed classes at Sollers Point in either the morning or the afternoon, while taking their other courses and their extracurricular activities at their home schools during the other half of the day. Sollers Point has been a successful model since its founding in 1966. Since 2013, its new campus has been co-located with Essex Community College, providing an easy transition for Sollers Point graduates as well as college class availability for dual enrollment students. Could Garrett design something similar at Garrett College?
  • Schools must teach our nation’s complete history, both the achievements we should emulate and the mistakes we must mitigate or avoid repeating.
    • All of American history is Our History, both the high points and the low points. We do ourselves and our children a disservice if we deny or downplay portions of our past which we find embarrassing, or unduly glorify aspects of our history that we find glorious. In the American History class in my Catholic elementary school, I clearly remember learning that Fr. Junipero Serra was the greatest American of all time – a tad overstated, one might think, even including his imagined nationality.